Eight more years of leap-second problems loom as governments punt decision to 2023

By November 20, 2015 News

By Peter Sayer Tick. Tick. Tick. Clang! That was the sound of an intergovernmental conference kicking the leap-second can down the road. Sysadmins will be dealing with the consequences for the next eight years.Just as adding an extra day in leap years helps us keep our calendars in step with the rotation of the earth around the sun, adding occasional leap seconds to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) allows us to keep this time reference in step with the earth’s gradually slowing rotation. Without adjustment, there would be about a minute’s difference between the two by 2100.[ Find out how software-defined networking is changing the data center with InfoWorld’s special report. Download it today! | Get the latest practical data center info and news with Paul Venezia’s The Deep End blog. ]Leap seconds are great if you’re using your time reference to note exactly when the sun should be directly overhead, or when certain stars should be in view, but for keeping a bunch of servers or Internet routers in sync around the world, continuity matters more than your place in the universe.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here …read more

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